The Tree That Won The War

Wander for just a few minutes from the Rogue Distillery in Newport, Oregon, and you may soon find yourself standing next to a towering Sitka Spruce.

These are some of the biggest and longest living trees in the world. They love the terroir of the Oregon coast. The temperate climate, the rainy winters and summer fog.  In fact, Sitka Spruce is so well adapted to the Pacific Northwest Coast it doesn’t grow anywhere else.

These coastal giants are what inspired us to create Rogue Spirits Spruce Gin.

Sitka Spruce can grow up to 200 feet tall and live up to 800 years.

Sitka Spruce can grow up to 200 feet tall and live up to 800 years.

Spruce needles are harvested in the spring when they’re bright green.

When picked fresh, Sitka Spruce needles are edible and high in vitamin C.

When picked fresh, Sitka Spruce needles are edible and high in vitamin C.

What we also love about Sitka Spruce is the role it played in Newport history during World War I.

When the U.S. entered the war in 1917 it was woefully short on combat aircraft. Back then planes were made out of wood, and the best wood possible was Sitka Spruce. It was strong, light and bendable. It could take an enemy bullet without splintering into pieces.

To make sure there was enough Sitka Spruce for the war effort, the army drafted 28,000 soldiers and turned them into loggers. The men marched into the woods surrounding Newport and began cutting Sitka Spruce. They were joined by lumbermen and timber companies who set aside their differences for a common cause.  In just one year Sitka Spruce production increased 800%.

Members of the Army Spruce Division  at a logging camp near Newport in 1918.

Members of the Army Spruce Division at a logging camp near Newport in 1918.

spruce_ginIn addition to Spruce needles, Rogue Spirits Spruce Gin is distilled with Juniper Berries, Ginger, Fresh Cucumber, Orris Root, Orange Peel, Lemon Peel, Tangerine, Grains of Paradise, Angelica Root & Coriander & Free Range Coastal Water.

Every bottle is a taste of the terroir of our hometown on the Oregon Coast and a tribute to what we can accomplish when we work together for the greater good.

 

 



Categories: Spirits

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